Wednesday, December 7, 2016

xinput is not a configuration UI

xinput is a tool to query and modify X input device properties (amongst other things). Every so-often someone-complains about it's non-intuitive interface, but this is where users are mistaken: xinput is a not a configuration UI. It is a DUI - a developer user interface [1] - intended to test things without having to write custom (more user-friendly) for each new property. It is nothing but a tool to access what is effectively a key-value store. To use it you need to know not only the key name(s) but also the allowed formats, some of which are only documented in header files. It is intended to be run under user supervision, anything it does won't survive device hotplugging. Relying on xinput for configuration is the same as relying on 'echo' to toggle parameters in /sys for kernel configuration. It kinda possibly maybe works most of the time but it's not pretty. And it's not intended to be, so please don't complain to me about the arcane user interface.

[1] don't do it, things will be a bit confusing, you may not do the right thing, you can easily do damage, etc. A lot of similarities... ;)

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

New udev property: XKB_FIXED_LAYOUT for keyboards that must not change layouts

This post mostly affects developers of desktop environments/Wayland compositors. A systemd pull request was merged to add two new properties to some keyboards: XKB_FIXED_LAYOUT and XKB_FIXED_VARIANT. If set, the device must not be switched to a user-configured layout but rather the one set in the properties. This is required to make fake keyboard devices work correctly out-of-the-box. For example, Yubikeys emulate a keyboard and send the configured passwords as key codes matching a US keyboard layout. If a different layout is applied, then the password may get mangled by the client.

Since udev and libinput are sitting below the keyboard layout there isn't much we can do in this layer. This is a job for those parts that handle keyboard layouts and layout configurations, i.e. GNOME, KDE, etc. I've filed a bug for gnome here, please do so for your desktop environment.

If you have a device that falls into this category, please submit a systemd patch/file a bug and cc me on it (@whot).

Monday, December 5, 2016

The future of xinput, xmodmap, setxkbmap, xsetwacom and other tools under Wayland

This post applies to most tools that interface with the X server and change settings in the server, including xinput, xmodmap, setxkbmap, xkbcomp, xrandr, xsetwacom and other tools that start with x. The one word to sum up the future for these tools under Wayland is: "non-functional".

An X window manager is little more than an innocent bystander when it comes to anything input-related. Short of handling global shortcuts and intercepting some mouse button presses (to bring the clicked window to the front) there is very little a window manager can do. It's a separate process to the X server and does not receive most input events and it cannot affect what events are being generated. When it comes to input device configuration, any X client can tell the server to change it - that's why general debugging tools like xinput work.

A Wayland compositor is much more, it is a window manager and the display server merged into one process. This gives the compositor a lot more power and responsibility. It handles all input events as they come out of libinput and also manages device's configuration. Oh, and instead of the X protocol it speaks Wayland protocol.

The difference becomes more obvious when you consider what happens when you toggle a setting in the GNOME control center. In both Wayland and X, the control center toggles a gsettings key and waits for some other process to pick it up. In both cases, mutter gets notified about the change but what happens then is quite different. In GNOME(X), mutter tells the X server to change a device property, the server passes that on to the xf86-input-libinput driver and from there the setting is toggled in libinput. In GNOME(Wayland), mutter toggles the setting directly in libinput.

Since there is no X server in the stack, the various tools can't talk to it. So to get the tools to work they would have to talk to the compositor instead. But they only know how to speak X protocol, and no Wayland protocol extension exists for input device configuration. Such a Wayland protocol extension would most likely have to be a private one since the various compositors expose device configuration in different ways. Whether this extension will be written and added to compositors is uncertain, I'm not aware of any plans or even intentions to do so (it's a very messy problem). But either way, until it exists, the tools will merely shout into the void, without even an echo to keep them entertained. Non-functional is thus a good summary.

Please don't use pastebins in bugs

pastebins are useful for dumping large data sets whenever the medium of conversation doesn't make this easy or useful. IRC is one example, or audio/video conferencing. But pastebins only work when the other side looks at the pastebin before it expires, and the default expiry date for a pastebin may only be a few days.

This makes them effectively useless for bugs where it may take a while for the bug to be triaged and the assignee to respond. It may take even longer to figure out the source of the bug, and if there's a regression it can take months to figure it out. Once the content disappears we have to re-request the data from the reporter. And there is a vicious dependency too: usually, logs are more important for difficult bugs. Difficult bugs take longer to fix. Thus, with pastebins, the more difficult the bug, the more likely the logs become unavailable.

All useful bug tracking systems have an attachment facility. Use that instead, it's archived with the bug and if a year later we notice a regression, we still have access to the data.

If you got here because I pasted the link to this blog post, please do the following: download the pastebin content as raw text, then add it as attachment to the bug (don't paste it as comment). Once that's done, we can have a look at your bug again.

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

libinput now requires axis resolutions for graphics tablets

I pushed the patch to require resolution today, expect this to hit the general public with libinput 1.6. If your graphics tablet does not provide axis resolution we will need to add a hwdb entry. Please file a bug in systemd and CC me on it (@whot).

How do you know if your device has resolution? Run sudo evemu-describe against the device node and look for the ABS_X/ABS_Y entries:

#     Event code 0 (ABS_X)
#       Value   2550
#       Min        0
#       Max     3968
#       Fuzz       0
#       Flat       0
#       Resolution 13
#     Event code 1 (ABS_Y)
#       Value   1323
#       Min        0
#       Max     2240
#       Fuzz       0
#       Flat       0
#       Resolution 13
if the Resolution value is 0 you'll need a hwdb entry or your tablet will stop working in libinput 1.6. You can file the bug now and we can get it fixed, that way it'll be in place once 1.6 comes out.

Sunday, November 20, 2016

Fedora - retiring xorg-x11-drv-synaptics

The Fedora Change to retire the synaptics driver was approved by FESCO. This will apply to Fedora 26 and is part of a cleanup to, ironically, make the synaptics driver easier to install.

Since Fedora 22, xorg-x11-drv-libinput is the preferred input driver. For historical reasons, almost all users have the xorg-x11-drv-synaptics package installed. But to actually use the synaptics driver over xorg-x11-drv-libinput requires a manually dropped xorg.conf.d snippet. And that's just not ideal. Unfortunately, in DNF/RPM we cannot just say "replace the xorg-x11-drv-synaptics package with xorg-x11-drv-libinput on update but still allow users to install xorg-x11-drv-synaptics after that".

So the path taken is a package rename. Starting with Fedora 26, xorg-x11-drv-libinput's RPM will Provide/Obsolete [1] xorg-x11-drv-synaptics and thus remove the old package on update. Users that need the synaptics driver then need to install xorg-x11-drv-synaptics-legacy. This driver will then install itself correctly without extra user intervention and will take precedence over the libinput driver. Removing xorg-x11-drv-synaptics-legacy will remove the driver assignment and thus fall back to libinput for touchpads. So aside from the name change, everything else works smoother now. Both packages are now updated in Rawhide and should be available from your local mirror soon.

What does this mean for you as a user? If you are a synaptics user, after an update/install, you need to now manually install xorg-x11-drv-synaptics-legacy. You can remove any xorg.conf.d snippets assigning the synaptics driver unless they also include other custom configuration.

See the Fedora Change page for details. Note that this is a Fedora-specific change only, the upstream change for this is already in place.

[1] "Provide" in RPM-speak means the package provides functionality otherwise provided by some other package even though it may not necessarily provide the code from that package. "Obsolete" means that installing this package replaces the obsoleted package.

Monday, November 14, 2016

Does $FEATURE work under Wayland?

I've written more extensively about this here but here's an analogy that should get the point across a bit better: Wayland is just a protocol, just like HTTP. In both cases, you have two sides with very different roles and functionality. In the HTTP case, you have the server (e.g. Apache) and the client (a browser, e.g. Firefox). The communication protocol is HTTP but both sides make a lot of decisions unrelated to the protocol. The server decides what data is sent, the client decides how the data is presented to the user. Wayland is very similar. The server, called the "compositor", decides what data is sent (also: which of the clients even gets the data). The client renders the data [1] and decides what to do with input like key strokes, etc.

Asking Does $FEATURE work under Wayland? is akin to asking Does $FEATURE work under HTTP?. The only answer is: it depends on the compositor and on the client. It's the wrong question. You should ask questions related to the compositor and the client instead, e.g. "does $FEATURE work in GNOME?" or "does $FEATURE work in GTK applications?". That's a question that can be answered.

Of course, there are some cases where the fault is really the protocol itself. But often enough, it's not.

[1] albeit it does so by telling the compositor to display it. The analogy with HTTP only works to some extent... :)